Hawk Haven

Handling Injured Raptors

Be certain the bird really needs rescuing. Is it an uninjured juvenile? Are its parents still feeding it? Be careful! Raptors have sharp talons and beaks and unless extremely sick, they are very, very fast! A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Throw a towel, blanket or jacket over the bird and place it in an airy cardboard box. AS SOON AS POSSIBLE call a wildlife shelter, veterinarian or your relevant government agency. Avoid handling the bird too much or feeding it. Young raptors can become imprinted on humans severely reducing their chances of successful rehabilitation. DO NOT place the bird in a wire enclosure. This may result in severe feather and cere (skin around the nostril area) damage. Resist the temptation to keep the bird for any length of time. Raptors are demanding patients requiring specialised care and diet. It may need expert care urgently!

Hawk Haven

About Birds of Prey

Birds of prey or ‘raptors’ can be distinguished from other birds in a number of ways including; Hooked beaks Strong feet and talons Outstanding eyesight Reverse sexual dimorphism i.e. the female is larger than the male The term ‘raptor’ is Latin and means ‘to seize and carry away’. Raptors are found on all continents except Antarctica and on many small islands. The 287 species vary from the tiny falconets weighing only 60 grams to large eagles and vultures that may be as heavy as 9 kilograms. 24 species of raptor breed in Australia, a relatively small number for such a large continent. Of these, six are falcons and 18 are hawks, kites and eagles. We have no vultures or true buzzards. Broadly speaking the raptors can be divided into two main groups, the Accipitridae and Falconidae. The accipitrids include the hawks, kites, harriers, vultures and eagles. The falconids, or falcons,…

Hawk Haven

Artwork For Sale

In order to support the important work of raptor rehabilitation and education, I produce wildlife art which is inspired by these magnificent creatures. For a full range of my original artworks and prints please visit my art website: www.natureartists.com/martin_scuffins.asp Availability and Pricing Contact us for prices and availability.

Hawk Haven

Educational Programs

Meet the Beaks ‘In the end we will conserve what we love and respect we will love and respect only what we understand We will understand only what we are taught or allowed to experience’ – Anon Hawk Haven holds a scientific permit to retain two non-releasable birds of prey for educational purposes. The current birds on ‘staff’ are a Nankeen Kestrel and a Little Eagle. ‘Meet the Beaks’ is available to school groups in the Ballarat district from the 1st May until the 1st of December each year subject to availability. As housing, feeding and transporting these birds is time consuming and expensive, we do ask for a donation to cover costs and contribute to their upkeep. Advanced booking is essential. Due to our permit conditions, we cannot currently offer ‘Meet the Beaks’ to groups of adults. Why birds of prey don’t make suitable pets Living with eagles (particularly…

Hawk Haven

Raptor Rehabilitation

Every year we receive many sick and injured birds of prey for care and the number of calls we receive is steadily increasing as caring members of the community become aware of the work we do. Many of these birds have been injured in the course of human activity. A large proportion of injured birds have been found on roadsides, often with severe injuries consistent with motor vehicle impact. For a bird of prey, roadsides are attractive places. Grassy verges provide habitat for prey items such as mice, insects and reptiles, and road killed wildlife presents an easy and tempting meal. Unfortunately, roads are also crowded and dangerous environments. Raptors risk being struck by vehicles, becoming entangled in roadside fences or colliding with electrical infrastructure. One kestrel brought to us with a broken wing had been struck by a car and carried in the grill for approximately 20 kilometers! Fortunately,…